Men's Health

There are many health issues that affect men and included here is information about some of the more common problems.

This page may not give you all the information you want, so please click onto the links for further information.

Testicular Cancer

Testicular Cancer: The Facts

  • Nearly 2,000 men are diagnosed in the UK each year.
  • It is the most common cancer affecting young men between 20 and 39 years old.
  • The most common symptom of testicular cancer is a lump or swelling in a part of one testicle.

Testicular Awareness:

  • Check your testicles once a month. The best time to check them is when your scrotal skin is relaxed, for example, after you have had a warm shower or bath.
  • Hold your scrotum in the palms of your hands, and use your fingers and thumbs to examine each testicle individually. Feel the size and weight of your testicles, they should feel smooth, with no lumps or swellings.
  • If you find a lump, visit your GP who will examine you and possibly refer you to a hospital specialist for tests to see whether you have testicular cancer.
  • Treatment for testicular cancer works very well and many men are cured.

For more information on Testicular Cancer please click below:

Cancer Research UK
NHS Direct

Want to Quit smoking? Island Quitters is your LOCAL NHS Stop Smoking Service. The Specialised advisors at Island Quitters will support you through every step of your quit. The drop-in sessions are friendly, non-judgemental and very informal. For more details about drop-in sessions and one-to-one appointments call (01983) 814280.

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Prostate Cancer

Prostate Cancer: The Facts

  • Prostate cancer generally affects men over the age of 50.
  • The prostate is found only in men. It surrounds the first part of the urethra and produces a thick clear fluid which is an important part of the semen.
  • Around 32,000 men in the UK are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year.

Prostate Awareness

  • The most common symptoms are:
    • Difficulty in passing urine.
    • Passing urine more frequently than usual, especially at night.
    • Pain when passing urine.
  • If you have symptoms, visit your GP.
  • Your GP may carry out a digital rectal examination and a PSA blood test. PSA is a protein produced by the prostate. Men with prostate cancer tend to have some PSA in their blood.

For more information on Prostate Cancer please click below:

NHS Direct
Cancer Research UK
Macmillan Cancer Support

Want to Quit smoking? Island Quitters is your LOCAL NHS Stop Smoking Service. The Specialised advisors at Island Quitters will support you through every step of your quit. The drop-in sessions are friendly, non-judgemental and very informal. For more details on drop-in sessions and one-to-one appointments call (01983) 814280.

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Bowel Cancer

Bowel Cancer: The Facts

  • Bowel Cancer is the third most common cancer in the UK affecting both men and women.
  • 85% of all diagnosis are in people over the age of 60.
  • If caught early, bowel cancer is highly treatable.

Bowel Cancer Awareness:

  • Symptoms of Bowel Cancer:
    • Bleeding from the back passage (rectum) or blood in your stools.
    • A straining feeling in the rectum.
    • Weight loss.
    • Pain in rectum or abdomen.
  • If you have symptoms, visit your GP.

For more information on Bowel Cancer please click below:

Bowel Cancer UK
Cancer Research UK

Want to Quit smoking? Island Quitters is your LOCAL NHS Stop Smoking Service. The Specialised advisors at Island Quitters will support you through every step of your quit. The drop-in sessions are friendly, non-judgemental and very informal. For more details on drop-in sessions and one-to-one appointments call (01983) 814280.

Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile Dysfunction: The Facts.

  • Erection problems are very common. The Sexual Dysfunction Association estimates that 1 in 10 men in the UK have recurring problems with their erections at some point in their life.
  • Erectile Dysfunction is when a man keeps have difficulty getting or keeping an erection.
  • Anything affecting the arteries, veins or nerves that supply the penis will influence the ability to have an erections, for example; drinking alcohol, smoking, some medicines or long-term conditions.

Treatment and Advice:

  • If you are unable to get or keep an erection, visit your GP.
  • There are many treatments for erectile dysfunction, such as limiting alcohol consumption, reducing stress levels, giving up smoking and prescription drugs.

For more information on Erectile Dysfunction please click on the below:

Patient UK
NHS Direct Erectile Dysfunction

Want to Quit smoking? Island Quitters is your LOCAL NHS Stop Smoking Service. The Specialised advisors at Island Quitters will support you through every step of your quit. The drop-in sessions are friendly, non-judgemental and very informal. For more details on drop-in sessions and one-to-one appointments call (01983) 814280.

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Where to get help